Bring your artwork up to trick the eye and expand or accentuate the height of the room. A gallery wall might seem too busy for a small space, but it can actually make it feel larger if it extends to the ceiling. In this family room designed by Kate Ridder, the mirrored effect of this glossy red paint on the ceiling makes the small space feel like a fun house.

Looking for living room ideas? Whether your living room is lacklustre, your lounge is limited in space, your sitting room is suffering from outdated decor or your front room is full of clutter, there are living room ideas and designs that will inspire you to breathe life into your living space. Discover small living room ideas to help maximise tiny spaces or layout ideas that will work with awkward shaped living rooms. Perhaps you’re struggling to decide on living room colours? Read on for help with colours, layout and design ideas, or find inspiration from the millions of living room photos on Houzz.
Although moldings and trims are small part of a living room’s decor, they also contribute to added costs. Ceiling cornices and baseboards, for example, typically run the full expanse of the living room’s perimeter, thus they require a good amount of material, depending on the size of the room. Consequently, the main factor that affects the cost of materials for living room decorative trims is the size of the room.
Think of a secondary purpose for your living room – A good way to optimize space, whether dealing with a small living room or a large living room, is to use it for a secondary purpose. Nowadays, most homes combine two areas together such as a living room with a music room or home office. The best way to take advantage of a living room remodel is to incorporate a secondary purpose for your space and you can do this by carefully planning the layout and design essentials ahead of time. Aside from that, multipurpose furniture such as sofa beds also help achieve a dual function living room.

The best place to start is with the seating – one corner sofa will usually seat three to four people, and if that’s all you think you’ll need, then you can leave it at that. Placing your sofa along the longest wall helps to make the most of the space, but think about where you want the focus of the room to be, too. If you need more seating, look at armchairs that offer comfort but don’t take up too much space – cramming a room with too many large armchairs is something to avoid. But armchairs and sofas don’t have to be your only options – go for bean bags and floor cushions for an eclectic feel, pouffes and ottomans if you’re more traditional, and smart design chairs for contemporary living room ideas.
When you have to work with a room with an awkward shape, implementing the small living room designs that you love becomes a major challenge. It may not look like it, but this room had some incredible design challenges, including a cramped dining area. To remedy this, the designer decided to hang some mirrors in the dining area. Not only does the space look larger, but it also transforms the way the dining area looks. By putting the chairs on one side and the mirrors on the other, the dining area doesn’t look nearly as small as it truly is.

Because of this ranch-style California home's open floor plan, the owner had to get creative with carving out designated spaces for "rooms." To help differentiate this living room from the adjacent kitchen and den, she placed the midcentury sofa (recovered with leather in the 1970s) on a vintage Moroccan rug she found on eBay. The floor-to-ceiling storage nook keeps books, blankets, and firewood at the ready.
For a Gramercy Park apartment, designer Bennett Leifer upholstered a settee in a Sabina Fay Braxton velvet, and chose a pair of carved wood armchairs by de Gournay covered in a Stark velvet. The Empire console is from Lucca Antiques, the cocktail table is by Ebanista, the vintage stool is by Maison Baguès, the Louis XVI secretary was purchased on 1stdibs, the Tabriz rug is antique, and the walls are painted in Benjamin Moore’s Alexandria Beige.
Think long-term. Remember to plan not only for this stage of your life, but for the next phases, as well. If you're newlyweds planning to have children in a few years, take those future kids into account when planning your renovation, so that you don't have to redo everything. Ask people who already have kids what works in real life and what doesn't; what they wish they had in their living rooms; what has caused safety issues or got broken so many times it had to be thrown away.
The living room is the social center of most homes. No doubt yours sees plenty of use. That’s all the more reason to dedicate some extra time toward making it amazing. Whether you’re on a tight budget or just enjoy doing things yourself, there are hundreds of surprisingly sophisticated DIY projects out there for aspiring amateur designers. We’ve put together an awesome list of 48 DIY living room decorating ideas to help you update everything from your coffee table to your throw pillows.
Keep a list – Creating a list of the things that you need for your living room remodel project  allows you to keep track of the expenses that you might incur as you go along with the renovation. Prioritize important items first, then put a contingency for extra items like accessories and other decorations. Leave room for finishing touches as they can go a long way in terms of visual appeal.
When space is lacking, the only option is to get creative and make things multi-purpose. For example, if you don't have room for a separate living room, family room, and home office, combine each concept into one space. This living room and office by Leanne Ford Interiors proves that the right layout and pieces can look great, no matter what shape or size the room.
In general, wall treatments for living room renovation projects can run from $500 to $2500 per project, depending on the material, the type of finish and the amount of prep work needed to complete the project. Other factors which greatly affect the cost of wall treatments for living room renovations are the size of the room and the height of the wall, since they determine the full area of material coverage.
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