Architect Luís Bernardo Brito e Abreu renovated his São Miguel home to reflect his family's artistic, maritime history. The living room features a vintage chair by Illum Wikkelsø, and the mantel and stone benches are both of local basalt. The sculpture of a head on the bench at right is by Ernesto Canto da Maya, and the wall sculpture above the mantel is a 16th-century naval decoration.
Have you ever seen a room in a magazine that was just so stunning that you had to have it in your own home? While you may not be able to recreate it perfectly, decorating a small living room doesn’t have to break the bank. Print the picture out, take it with you to your favorite furniture stores and have a little fun trying to match each piece. You probably won’t find perfect matches, but similar pieces you do find will feel much more personal and make the final space much cozier. For visual interest, try some thrift store finds.

In home design, one practice that novice designers avoid is mixing and matching patterns or textures. Many beginning designers stick with a uniform and consistent look in order to play it safe. While that isn’t necessarily bad, this room shows how rewarding it can be to get creative and take a few risks. Leather, glass, metal, wood and even water join forces with lovely neutral tones, zebra print, jagged stripes and a spectacular art piece to create a small living room sure to get guests talking. There is so much going on in this room, but it isn’t overwhelming, either.


With the possibility of unforeseeable issues, it is best to have a contingency fund to make you prepared along the process. In addition, room expansions for living room renovation projects should not be taken lightly and must be left to the hands of a trusted professional. Scout for a good contractor as he will be able to assess everything carefully, spot problem areas ahead of time and prepare a complete bid.
On the other hand, major renovations for a living room remodel project are more labor intensive, take longer time to finish and typically require professional help. Major renovations may involve structural modifications, demolition work, electrical wiring and typically include improvements done on the floor, walls and ceiling. It may also include a series of minor renovations, thus making it more of a larger scale project in the process. Major renovations are also sometimes referred to as a “full renovation” because instead of just improving a part of the living room, the scope of work requires enhancement and constructions works for the whole space and all its elements – meaning wall, floor, ceiling, furniture, furnishings and lighting. Examples of major renovation works are demolition works like removing an existing partition, tearing down the whole ceiling. Electrical works like rewiring, taking out all old flooring and installing new materials, retiling of floors, construction of a drop, recessed or cove ceiling and the like.
Windows – If your living room lacks ventilation or looks too dark, you can also try to replace existing windows or add windows to your living room. Replacing old windows helps improve natural lighting, optimizes energy efficiency and gives added ventilation. In addition to the practical benefits, new windows can also contribute a new character to your living room.
A stacked fieldstone fireplace takes center stage in this family room. Rather than just a sheer wall of stone, the exposed chimney is designed with a central recess for artwork, along with tapered edges on either side, to keep it from appearing too overpowering. Sconces mounted directly to the stone are an attractive way to shed plenty of light on the antique timber mantel.
The following list includes major work tasks commonly performed during Living Room Remodeling. Use this list to understand the timing and sequence of different steps in the Living Room Remodeling project. Click any Task name for a complete written specifications, FAQs and quality checklist for the task - this essential information will help you control Living Room Remodeling project cost and quality.
Architect Luís Bernardo Brito e Abreu renovated his São Miguel home to reflect his family's artistic, maritime history. The living room features a vintage chair by Illum Wikkelsø, and the mantel and stone benches are both of local basalt. The sculpture of a head on the bench at right is by Ernesto Canto da Maya, and the wall sculpture above the mantel is a 16th-century naval decoration.
A good way to cut on costs when improving windows for living rooms is to furnish them with a window treatment. You can either buy new curtains, shades or blinds, depending on the prevailing style of your home. Window treatments are available in different types of materials and present a wide range of choices when it comes to design, colors and patterns.

The difference really is, as they say, in the details, whether that's a new lipstick, a touch of truffle oil, or in this case, pillows and paint. This living room already had a lot going for it: a rough-hewn coffee table, a versatile sofa by Cisco Brothers, and a gorgeous ceramic garden stool. But apply one shopping trip's worth of accessories—all under $100—and this just-okay space turns remarkably elegant.
In many homes, the living room is where families and their guests go to kick back and relax after a long day. In many homes, this room is also where the television, computer and other knickknacks come together and choke the space. This is even truer in a small living room, which fills up after putting just a few pieces of furniture inside. Because of this, many people think that having a larger space is better but that isn’t always true. The secret to making a small living room look good is to take advantage of the living space you already have.
Room Expansion – Some homeowners desire more living room space and one way to attain such is to expand the room and extend it to other areas in the house.  Living room remodel projects that include room expansions are laborious and typically involve  knocking down walls. Sure thing, the end product is aesthetically pleasing but make sure to take the necessary prep work before engaging into this process.
Have you ever seen a room in a magazine that was just so stunning that you had to have it in your own home? While you may not be able to recreate it perfectly, decorating a small living room doesn’t have to break the bank. Print the picture out, take it with you to your favorite furniture stores and have a little fun trying to match each piece. You probably won’t find perfect matches, but similar pieces you do find will feel much more personal and make the final space much cozier. For visual interest, try some thrift store finds.
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