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Aside from the adorable dogs (Jacob and Wylo) cuddled up on the armchair-meets-dog-bed, that gallery wall is the clear statement-maker in this living room designed by Philip Mitchell. Mix and match frames for a subtle nod of personality. And speaking of personal touches, consider hanging art that means something to you, whether it's your children's artwork, your own, or a portrait of your pets.
Alisa Bloom recreated the environment of a French interior in her sophisticated Chicago penthouse. In the living room, she opted for a custom sofa in a Kravet fabric with pillows in a Jim Thompson silk. The 1970s chairs are from Revival, and the vintage cocktail table is from Martin La Brocante. She finished the space with a console by Crate & Barrel, a vintage chandelier by Hans-Agne Jakobsson, and curtains in an Oscar de la Renta fabric for Lee Jofa. The walls are painted in Benjamin Moore’s Cement Gray.

In the living room of a Manhattan apartment designed by Jamie Drake and Caleb Anderson of Drake/Anderson, the sectional sofas by Avenue Road are covered in a Great Plains mohair, the pair of vintage Gio Ponti armchairs are from Karl Kemp Antiques, the glass cocktail table by Fredrikson Stallard is filled with feathers, the round side table is by Holly Hunt Studio, the lamp on it is by Charles Paris and the custom rug is by Tai Ping.


Paint fixes a multitude of sins, like the bad veneer that originally topped this $10 thrift-shop table. The heavy books in the built-in corner shelf were swapped for lighter white ceramic pieces, and the small pieces of artwork was taken down in favor of a more balanced salon-style collection of frames. The walls are painted with Benjamin Moore's Sea View.

Looking for some cheap DIY decor ideas for the living room? When it comes to decorating, you need not spend a ton of money to have awesome furniture and decor. When it comes to creative and cool furnishings, often the things you can make for your home look better than anything you can buy in stores. If you’ve seen the little plastic fake chalkboard labels on things for sale in stores, you will know exactly what I mean. When stores start selling copies of the top DIYs on Pinterest, you know your love of making things is about to pay off big. Make the home decor of your dreams while maintaining your budget so you can retire early, go on that big vacation or whatever it is you’d rather save that money for. Make these cool projects this weekend and get to decorate anyway. From wall art to seating to coffee tables and mantle decor, we have you covered when it comes to the best DIY living room decor ideas you can make inexpensively.


A stacked fieldstone fireplace takes center stage in this family room. Rather than just a sheer wall of stone, the exposed chimney is designed with a central recess for artwork, along with tapered edges on either side, to keep it from appearing too overpowering. Sconces mounted directly to the stone are an attractive way to shed plenty of light on the antique timber mantel.

Wallpaper is one of those trends that just keeps on giving and giving. If you go with a classic chinoiserie wallpaper, you can do just about anything with it as your style changes over the year. This modern self portrait by Chuck Close is a bold contrast to the chinoiserie wallpaper (Iksel's Eastern Eden) behind it in this Miles Redd-designed home. The contrast doesn't stop there: Redd continued to venture beyond design convention by incorporating contrasting jewel tones and mixing modern furniture styles with antique pieces. Oh—and believe it or not, the lime green chair is from Ikea! Proof even the best designers love a good deal.

Living Room Size and Layout – The size of a room is one of the key cost factors in determining the total amount of budget that you will be needing for a living room remodel project. The size of the room does not only determine the total area of the space, but it also partially defines the scope of work for the project. This is mainly because most of the aspects of construction are affected by the square footage of the site and oftentimes materials and labor are priced per square foot.

When space is lacking, the only option is to get creative and make things multi-purpose. For example, if you don't have room for a separate living room, family room, and home office, combine each concept into one space. This living room and office by Leanne Ford Interiors proves that the right layout and pieces can look great, no matter what shape or size the room.
• Ceiling – Ceiling works also take up a large part of the costs of any type of renovation project, mainly because of the extensive amount of work that they require. For living room remodel projects, minor ceiling renovation works may range from simple repainting and repair. While major ceiling renovation works range from removing old ceiling boards to replacing them with new gypsum boards to the improvement of the ceiling layout and design. In some cases, the ceiling is given a whole new look by installing recessed, drop or cove ceilings. Other options for living room ceiling finishes are textured panels, wallpaper, wood accents, creative paint treatments and other trim finishes.
On the average, renovations for ceiling treatments in living rooms run from $500 to $2300 per project, varying on the types of material used, the complexity of the project, the type of labor and installation. Projects which are more complex are obviously more expensive. Some of these require multiple stage installations such as constructing a built up or drop ceiling and applying features. The height of the ceiling is also a critical aspect of the cost since high ceilings require added scaffolding and are more difficult to deal with. The shape of the ceiling is also another cost factor as slanted and curved ceilings are much harder to install than flat ceilings. The more complex the design of the ceiling is the more extensive the prep work is, the more site visits required and the more added staging and equipment needed for construction.

This floor-to-ceilings fireplace in a living room designed by Leanne Ford is taking style notes from the best of both worlds: A classic mountain chalet and the Malibu coast. Whether there's snow falling or waves crashing right outside that window, we want to be curled up on that linen slip-covered chair. This living room is also a testament to the perks of working with what you have. The fireplace was given a new life with a makeshift mantle comprised of reclaimed wood and a fresh coat of white paint.

In general, wall treatments for living room renovation projects can run from $500 to $2500 per project, depending on the material, the type of finish and the amount of prep work needed to complete the project. Other factors which greatly affect the cost of wall treatments for living room renovations are the size of the room and the height of the wall, since they determine the full area of material coverage.
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